Choosing a non-standard design (Omega) and finish (satin nickel) add to an opening’s aesthetics, while maintaining safety, security and accessibility.

Many months ago, Anderson Lock updated its Mission Statement to: 

“Promoting peace of mind by providing quality solutions that improve the safety, security, accessibility and aesthetics of buildings.”

At that time, we pondered each of the 18 words that define our company’s vision, but this blog is only going to ponder “aesthetics.”

Although safety, security and accessibility are fundamental characteristics of a commercial lock sales and service company, aesthetics might seem a bit, well, artistic. The “beauty” of most door hardware is secondary to its functionality. And, yes, safety, security and even accessibility are more critical considerations when specifying new or replacement hardware for a commercial, institutional or industrial building. But there is ample opportunity to select designs, finishes and coordinating products that will enhance the aesthetics of the opening.

A study of door replacement “before” photos of  shows how ugly some doors become! Rusted, dented, warped hollow metal doors with twisted frames are not only unattractive, they are security risks. Sagging levers, leaky door closers, loose hinges, and wobbly thresholds impair accessibility and detract from a building’s appearance. But some door hardware is needlessly unattractive. Mis-matched finishes, ill-proportioned door hardware and carelessly installed locks and closers look unsightly. When building and fire codes are jeopardized, it is not just appalling, it is unlawful.

It is not that difficult to also consider aesthetics when selecting replacement doors, frames and security door hardware. The choices available for replacement commercial doors may seem mind boggling. But that is where our experienced estimators and hardware sales representatives come in. They can guide your selection of door type, door material, door color or finish, and door style. Doors for schools can be ordered in school colors. Doors for churches can have windows in the shape of a cross. Doors for offices can have wood grain stained to enhance interior decoration.

Grade 1 security door hardware is also available in a limited variety of finishes and designs. Coordinating “colors” from one manufacturer to another may take a bit of extra time when ordering, but the result is worth the effort. Lock manufacturers, like Schlage, produce Grade 2 locks, that can be used on lower traffic interior doors, in designs that match or coordinate with Grade 1 locks for exterior doors. Residential hardware designs can be used on interior doors in commercial and institutional facilities. Decorative door pulls, door numbers, and related, coordinated hardware can dress-up doors, and make them more eye-appealing.

Improved aesthetics give a friendlier, more welcoming appearance, while maintaining security, safety and accessibility. When choosing new doors and / or door hardware, select products that provide the level of security, safety and accessibility your building project requires. Then choose beauty. As Winston Churchill said, “We shape our buildings; thereafter they shape us.”

One of books from Gene Anderson’s office, ‘the Best of Success’, puts that same sentiment like this:

“We become like our environment, and our environment becomes like us. Everything around us molds and shapes us. So it is important to choose our environment with care: one that is positive, one that lifts us up and gives us wings to soar.”